The Baldy Center Podcast
Devonya Havis discusses the nature of truth and community practices for resistance

Devonya Havis discusses the nature of truth and community practices for resistance

November 30, 2021

Episode 23 features Devonya Havis, a 2021-2022 UB Center for Diversity Innovation Distinguished Scholar and associate professor in Philosophy at Canisius College. Dr. Havis discusses her research examining the nature of truth and the importance of broadening the field of philosophy to include the ways in which people encountering struggle engage in critical engagement about their condition. She specifically explores community practices, black ancestral practices, as an archive or guide for practice on how to push back.

Jordan Fox Besek on climate change and life finding a way

Jordan Fox Besek on climate change and life finding a way

November 15, 2021

Episode 22 of The Baldy Center Podcast features Department of Sociology Assistant Professor Jordan Fox Besek. Besek discusses his new project with Brooklyn College professor Daniel Shtob, humanity’s relationship with nature, and climate change. He explores the ways in which humans effect the environment, sometimes producing poor outcomes despite green intentions, and the ripple effect those actions have.

John Henry Schlegel and David A. Westbrook discuss “the adventure of thinking”

John Henry Schlegel and David A. Westbrook discuss “the adventure of thinking”

November 5, 2021

From the heights of his long tenure at the University at Buffalo School of Law, in Episode 21 of The Baldy Center Podcast, Distinguished Professor John Schlegel discusses US economic history, American Legal Realism, and his lived experience with legal education over the last half century, in particular, Critical Legal Studies. In this extemporaneous conversation, Del Cotto Professor David Westbrook affectionately provokes Schlegel to grapple with the necessary and complex ongoing negotiations between our concepts of adventure and stability, serious and fun, the endeavor of intellectual freedom... and the Borg.

David Herzberg discusses how the politics of whiteness has shaped the history of opioids, opioid addiction, and drug policy

David Herzberg discusses how the politics of whiteness has shaped the history of opioids, opioid addiction, and drug policy

October 22, 2021

Episode 20 features David Herzberg, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of History, University at Buffalo. Herzberg discusses repeated waves of addiction to pharmaceutical opioids and other medicines in the 20th and 21st century U.S. Among other things, he examines how the predominantly white consumers labeled as “patients” were understood as innocent victims when they became addicted, while consumers who became addicted outside of medical channels were portrayed as dangerous criminals.  Herzberg is the author of a history of addictive pharmaceuticals titled White Market Drugs: Big Pharma and the Hidden History of Addiction, and co-author of a forthcoming book with Helena Hansen and Jules Netherland about how the politics of whiteness has shaped the history of opioids, opioid addiction, and drug policy in the United States.

Episode 19 Helen Drew and Marissa Egloff discuss diversity, equity, and inclusion in major sports leagues

Episode 19 Helen Drew and Marissa Egloff discuss diversity, equity, and inclusion in major sports leagues

September 23, 2021

Episode 19 features Helen Drew, Professor of Law, and Marissa Egloff, a third year JD candidate, in the University at Buffalo School of Law. Professor Drew and Ms. Egloff discuss their research examining the number of women and minorities in executive or coaching positions in professional sports.  They are exploring why, even with proactive policies such as The Rooney Rule in the NFL, women and people of color find it difficult to obtain these “front office” positions.  They are also exploring how nondiverse work environments can become toxic.

Samantha Barbas discusses her new book The Rise and Fall of Morris Ernst: Free Speech Renegade

Samantha Barbas discusses her new book The Rise and Fall of Morris Ernst: Free Speech Renegade

September 7, 2021

Episode 18 features Samantha Barbas, Professor of Law and Director of The Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy in the University at Buffalo School of Law. Professor Barbas discusses her new book from University of Chicago Press (2021) The Rise and Fall of Morris Ernst: Free Speech Renegade. In the 1930s and ’40s, Morris Ernst was one of America’s best-known liberal lawyers. The ACLU’s general counsel for decades, Ernst was renowned for his audacious fights against artistic censorship. He successfully defended Ulysses against obscenity charges, litigated groundbreaking reproductive rights cases, and supported the widespread expansion of protections for sexual expression, union organizing, and public speech. Yet Ernst was also a man of stark contradictions, waging a personal battle against Communism, defending an autocrat, and aligning himself with J. Edgar Hoover’s inflammatory crusades.

Athena Mutua discusses the origins and goals of ClassCrits.

Athena Mutua discusses the origins and goals of ClassCrits.

May 4, 2021

Episode 15 features Athena Mutua, Professor and Law and Floyd H. & Hilda L. Hurst Faculty Scholar in the University at Buffalo School of Law. Professor Mutua discusses the origins and goals of ClassCrits, which focuses on the heterodox, or political economy approach in law. She presents the new online journal, The Journal of Law and Political Economy and discusses ways in which ClassCrits engages with ongoing and on the ground activist work in significant social issues.

Keywords: ClassCrits; Gender, Law, and Society; Inequality; Law and Economics; Law and Society; Race, Law, and Policy

The Alison L. Des Forges memorial committee members discuss the history of the Alison Des Forges Memorial Committee, and its international symposia on human rights held at the University at Buffalo.

The Alison L. Des Forges memorial committee members discuss the history of the Alison Des Forges Memorial Committee, and its international symposia on human rights held at the University at Buffalo.

April 21, 2021

Episode 14 is about the work of the Alison L. Des Forges Memorial Committee, and its international symposia on human rights held at the University at Buffalo. Beginning in 2012, each symposium has been annually sponsored, in part, by The Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy. This podcast features Roger Des Forges, the group's co-founder. He is joined in discussion the committee co-chairs, Ellen Dussourd and Shaun Irlam. Together, they offer insight on aspects of sustaining the annual Alison Des Forges International Symposia on Human Rights. The ninth annual event takes place April 30, 2021.

Keywords: Human Rights, Des Forges, Rwanda, Africa, genocide, regime change, Covid-19, China.​

 

Victoria-Idongesit Udondian discusses her sculptural work “The Republic of Unknown Territory” and immigration.

Victoria-Idongesit Udondian discusses her sculptural work “The Republic of Unknown Territory” and immigration.

March 22, 2021

Episode 13 features Victoria-Idongesit Udondian, interdisciplinary artist and University at Buffalo Center for Diversity Innovation Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the Department of Art. Udondian discusses her new sculptural work “The Republic of Unknown Territory) in the UB Arts Collaboratory until March 27, 2021, focused on immigrants’ experiences in migrating and building society. She highlights her study of the politics of the post-colonial global market in second-hand clothing, and her use of second-hand clothing in her art.

Keywords: Cultural Studies, Art and Politics, Narrative Studies, Immigration Studies, Post-colonialism, Global Trade Systems

Marie Jauffret-Roustide discusses harm reduction as an effective response to the opioid overdose crisis.

Marie Jauffret-Roustide discusses harm reduction as an effective response to the opioid overdose crisis.

March 8, 2021

Episode 12 features Marie Jauffret-Roustide, Senior Fellow in Interdisciplinary Legal Studies at The Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy and research fellow at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research in Paris, France. Jauffret-Roustide discusses the effectiveness of drug policies that are embedded in human rights and harm reduction, and compares them to repressive drug policies that are ineffective in protecting vulnerable people and the communities in which they live.

Keywords: Health and Society, Drug Policy, Law and Society, Harm Reduction, Health and Social Policy

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